A Baker’s Dozen Things You Should Know About Del Pratt

Del Pratt

Del Pratt

1. Derrill Pratt was born in 1888 in South Carolina.

2. In 1902 his family moved to Alabama.

3. He attended both Alabama Polytech (now Auburn) and the University of Alabama, playing both football and baseball.

4. In 1909 he led the Alabama baseball team to the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (now the SEC) championship.

5. Upon graduation he studied law, but gave it up to play baseball (and avoid countless lawyer jokes).

6. He spent 1910 and 1911 in the minors, making the St. Louis Browns in 1912.

7. Known primarily for his fielding he played second base and led the American League in assists, putouts, double plays, and range factor a number of times. He led the AL in RBIs in 1916, his only major hitting title.

8. With the team 36 games out of first in 1917, the owner accused the players of “laying down” against the Red Sox. In 1917, “laying down” was frequently a euphemism for throwing a game. Pratt sued the owner.

9. In 1918 he was traded to the Yankees, where he remained through 1920. In the latter season he generally hit fourth behind Babe Ruth.

10. He spent 1921 and 1922 in Boston, then finished his Major League career in Detroit in 1923 and 1934.

11. Out of the big leagues he both played and managed in the minors. In 1926 he won the Texas League hitting triple crown. He remained in the Texas League through 1932.

12. Between 1910 and 1920 he spent the off-season coaching a variety of college football teams.

13. He died in 1977.

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4 Responses to “A Baker’s Dozen Things You Should Know About Del Pratt”

  1. William Miller Says:

    Wow, He hit cleanup behind Babe Ruth for a year? Now that’s something to tell the grandkids.
    Nice post,
    Bill

  2. W.k. kortas Says:

    That’s a Hall of Pretty Damn Good career.

  3. Glen Russell Slater Says:

    “Upon graduation he studied law, but gave it up to play baseball (and avoid countless lawyer jokes).”

    Great line!

    Glen

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