Posts Tagged ‘Joey Votto’

Win Some, Win Some

November 17, 2017

 

One of Yogi Berra’s MVP Trophies

With the announcement of the MVP Awards last evening, the major awards season for MLB came to a close. In earlier posts I indicated who I thought would win the Manager of the Year, Rookie of the Year, Cy Young, and MVP Awards for both leagues. Now a couple of thoughts.

For the first time ever, I think, I got them all correct. I just went eight for eight which is absolutely astounding for me. I generally get about two out of three right. I’d like to pat myself on the back, but I do have short arms.

To be clear the picks I made (and did I tell you all my picks were right?) were the picks I thought would win, not necessarily the picks I thought ought to win. I would have voted for seven of the eight.

The one I wouldn’t have voted for? Stanton. I would have cast my vote for Joey Votto, who I thought had just an astoundingly good season. Without him, Cincinnati would have finished last (OOPS!!). OK, they would have lost 120 games. I’ve always liked Votto and will be interested to see his final statistics when he hangs up his uniform for the last time. It will also be interesting to see how a first baseman with limited power does in Hall of Fame voting.

Anyway, congratulations to the 2017 postseason award winners. Now on to the controversies about to erupt over the Hall of Fame voting (both vets and regular picks).

2017 Awards: MVP

October 13, 2017

And of course the final of the big postseason awards, the MVP.

American League

Jose Altuve

Jose Altuve led the Houston Astros to one of the best records in baseball. He led the AL in hits, in batting average, WAR, and is a pretty fair second baseman. I think all that will give him the title over Aaron Judge. It may also help that Judge can win the Rookie of the Year Award and my guess is that some writers will vote him the Rookie award and then decide “that’s enough” and slight him for the MVP. They shouldn’t, but someone probably will.

National League

Giancarlo Stanton

Although the Marlins didn’t make the playoffs, without Giancarlo Stanton they might not have gotten to 50 wins (OK, I’ll give the rest of the roster 60 wins). He led the majors in home runs, RBIs, and led the National League in WAR and slugging. Those are the kinds of numbers that get both traditionalists and more modern stat guys attention. I think Nolan Arenado should get a lot of consideration, but my guess is that the Coors Field factor will hurt him a lot (although he didn’t do badly on the road). On a personal note, I loved Joey Votto’s season and would be very happy if he picked up a lot of support. I also think that Goldschmidt will get a lot of support.

As usual, don’t put large bets on my say so.

Random Thoughts for the Midpoint of the 2012 Season

June 13, 2012

As I will be gone for the period leading up to the Fourth of July, I decided to post my midseason thoughts a little early, realizing that they may be out of date by the Fourth.

1. The American League East is starting to come around to what we expected. Tampa and New York are in first, Toronto is falling back. The strange teams are Baltimore and Boston. Did you really think Baltimore would be only one game out this late in the season or that Boston would be last? Both fooled me. Of course if you think about it Buck Showalter is a heck of a manager and the Red Sox are really starting to age. So maybe I shouldn’t have been fooled.

2. Whatever happened to Detroit? Weren’t they supposed to run away with the AL Central and then pummel the opposition in the playoffs? There are three aspects to baseball: offense, defense, and pitching. Someone forgot to tell Detroit you had to be able to catch and throw the ball. Oops. I’m not surprised by what’s happened to the Twins, but I’m saddened. They traditionally do more with less than anyone else and it’s finally caught up to them. Joe Mauer has his average back above .300, but the power seems to be gone. He’s 29 and that’s getting into the age range where catchers start imploding. And Justin Morneau seems to suffer a power drought also, although his average has begun climbing in the last month. Even Ron Gardenhire, a really good manager, isn’t going to get this team into contention.

3. So Albert Pujols was a bust was he? OK, he’s no longer Superman, but he’s not Clark Kent either. It looks like he’ll keep the Angels in contention and maybe get them to either a division title or a wildcard. Can Texas be stopped? Maybe. They remind me a lot of the 1950s-1960s Yankees. The ’50s-’60s Yankees had a series of good enough pitchers who could hold the other team down until the hitters simply bashed the opposition to death. Sound like the Rangers? The difference is that Texas has no Whitey Ford and I don’t know how much that will hurt them when the season draws down. Right now, Josh Hamilton is my MVP.

4. Does anyone understand what’s going on in the National League East? I’m not surprised that Philly is in trouble. Other than their pitching they weren’t all that strong anyway. The team is aging and Chase Utley can’t stay healthy. Hunter Pence isn’t going to be able to carry them and Jim Thome is apparently through (although I’d like to see him catch Sosa on the home run list). It seems the Mets have peaked (sorry, Bill) but maybe I’m wrong on that. I say that because I’m not really sold on either Washington or Atlanta so it’s possible the Mets will come back to win the division. If either they or the Nationals do, it will be one of the season’s great stories. And R. A. Dickey, my current Cy Young favorite is another great story for 2012. I’m not certain a knuckleballer can maintain the pace Dickey is setting.

5. OK, tell me you had Pittsburgh. Sure you did. Me too. I think the Pirates will fall back, but maybe they’ll finally finish over .500 this season (and I’ve got this great bridge in Brooklyn that I’ll let you have for a song). I still think the Cardinals take it, but Cincinnati might prove me wrong. Geez, is Joey Votto having a great season. I guess he’s my MVP right now, but then Lance Berkman was my MVP midway through last season.

6. The Dodgers are in first. Read that again. The Dodgers are in first. See what happens when you get rid of Frank McCourt and his wife. Maybe Magic Johnson is really “magic”. Actually it’s a really weak division and Arizona was a fluke last season. Maybe San Francisco can catch LA (please, God, anybody but the Giants) but they’ve still got to learn to hit. I’ve never been a particular fan of Tim Lincecum, but I’d hate to think he’s through already. So right now, is Don Mattingly manager of the year?

7. As of now my choice for biggest surprise of the year is LA and Detroit gets the nod as the biggest disappointment.

8. There used to be a saying that whoever was in first on the Fourth of July would win the pennant. As we’ve gotten more and more playoffs that saying has gone the way of the dinosaur. My guess is that about half the teams currently in first will win the division and maybe one or two others will get a wildcard. Don’t ask which because I don’t have a clue.

Picking the Winners: MVP

November 10, 2010

In two of my more recent posts I’ve ventured into the land of guesswork. By trying to fathom what the sports writers were going to do with the 2010 Cy Young Award, I started looking at this seasons awards. Here’s the next to last installment.

As I said in the first post about the 2010 awards, I’m not very good at this, but that’s never stopped me from putting my foot squarely in my mouth before, so why start now. Let me remind you this is my guess as to whom the writers will pick, not my own personal choice for the award. That I keep to myself.

There seems to be something of a growing consensus as to the 2010 MVP Award winners. I’ve looked at a lot of sites, read a lot of writers views on the matter and two names keep coming up. That being the case, I’m a little less concerned that I’m totally out in left field with this pick, unlike both the rookie and Cy Young awards.

NL-Joey Votto. Votto led the Reds in the categories that counted and played a decent first base this season. Votto led the NL in slugging and on base percentage. He was in the top three in home runs, RBIs, batting average, and total bases. Unfortunately so did Albert Pujols. I think that the writers will reward Votto over Pujols because the Reds won the division while St Louis, which was generally favored, folded. In defense of Pujols, the team faded much worse than he.

AL-Josh Hamilton. Hamilton is a great redemption story and that alone will get him some votes. But he also led the AL in hitting, slugging, OPS, and was in the top five in home runs, total bases, and on base percentage. Miguel Cabrera had an equally good year, but I think the combination of salvation and his team winning will put Hamilton in above Cabrera.