Posts Tagged ‘PeeWee Reese’

A Baker’s Dozen Things You Should Know About Andy High

June 29, 2013
Andy High as a Cardinal

Andy High as a Cardinal

1. Andrew A. High was born in Ava, Illinois on 21 November 1897.

2. Two of his brothers, Hugh and Charlie, played in the Major Leagues. Andy had the best career of the three.

3. He joined the US Navy in World War I as an electrician’s mate.

4. In 1919 he began play with the Memphis Chicks Minor League team. Initially an outfielder he moved to third base in 1920 and was bought (along with Dazzy Vance) by Brooklyn in 1922.

5. He remained with Brooklyn into 1925 when he was put on waivers. Boston (the Braves, not the Red Sox) picked him up. He moved on to St. Louis in 1928.

6. High was with St. Louis for three pennant winners: 1928, 1930, and 1931. His ninth inning run scoring single on 28 September 1928, tied the score and helped lead the Cardinals to a pennant clinching victory in 15 innings.

7. By 1930, he was working as the team’s primary pinch hitter and backup third baseman. He had only one appearance in the 1930 World Series, but started four (of seven) games in 1931. He scored two runs in the Series clinching seventh game. The final score was 4-2.

8. In 1932, he was traded to Cincinnati. He did poorly, was released mid-1933, and went to Columbus in the American Association. He got into 47 games with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1934.

9. He spent 1935 in the minors, then landed a coaching job with Brooklyn in 1936 which lasted through 1938.

10. In 1939 he became a scout for Brooklyn where he signed both PeeWee Reese and George Kell, two Hall of Fame infielders.

11. He left the Dodgers in 1943 and rejoined the US Navy. He was a SeaBee, serving with a construction unit in the South Pacific.

12. High returned to Brooklyn as a scout in 1945 and became Chief Scout in 1950. He remained in that position until his retirement in 1963.

13. He died in Ohio in 1981.

 

The 50 Greatest Dodgers

November 27, 2012

Don Newcombe, the 8th Greatest Dodger

Back a year or so ago I did a post on the 50 Greatest Yankees ever (according to ESPN). Turns out that the network did an entire series of these lists. You’ll have to look around pretty hard (or type in “greatest Dodgers” or whichever team) to find their lists but they are interesting.

One of the lists is the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers list. The top 10 (in order) look like this: Jackie Robinson, Sandy Koufax, Duke Snider, Zack Wheat, Roy Campanella, PeeWee Reese, Mike Piazza, Don Newcombe, Don Sutton, Dazzy Vance. And before anyone asks, Don Drysdale is 11th. Not a bad list actually, here’s a few comments on the list.

1. To create a full team you end up with Gil Hodges (16th on the list) at first, Robinson at second, Reese at short, and Roy Cey (14th on the list) at third. The outfield is Snider, Wheat, and Pedro Guerrero (15th on the list). Campanella catches and the first position player whose position is already covered is Piazza, making him the DH. The staff (four men for a World Series rotation, at least one being left-handed) is Koufax, Newcombe, Sutton, and Vance. Way down at 46th is Ron Perranoski, the only reliever on the list.

2. The list is a decent mix of both Brooklyn and Los Angeles, with LA being slightly favored in the higher parts of the list (see Guerrero over Babe Herman or Carl Furillo for example). There are, as you would expect with the Dodgers, an inordinate number of pitchers in the top 15.

3. They did put Dixie Walker on the list (he’s 25th). With the way he left the team (his opposition to Robinson) I half expected he’d be overlooked.

4. Wheat in the top 5 is inspired, as is Vance in the top 10. It’s unusual for guys who played that long ago to get much support when up against newer players that voters remember. However, Wheat over Campanella is questionable. Wheat and Vance are the only two players on the list who spent significant time with the Dodgers prior to 1940.

5. During their time together (most of the 1970s) Steve Garvey got a lot more press than Cey. This list placed Cey higher (14th to Garvey’s 17th). I think that’s probably right.

6. Jim Gilliam is at 43rd. That’s way too low. His versatility (second, third, center, and left) made him so much more valuable than his hitting stats (which aren’t bad either) made him appear.

7. Reggie Smith is at 26th. Again, I think that’s too low. I might slide him into the top 15. I know I’d put him in the top 20. I might even jump him over Guerrero. Smith is one of the more overlooked players in both Dodgers and Red Sox history.

8. The picking of  Newcombe over both Sutton and Drysdale is  interesting. Both ended up with more wins and Newk did have the drinking problem. I’m not sure the voters got it right. Maybe yes, maybe no.  Newcombe was the ace of the most famous (if not most successful) team in Dodgers history and that has to be worth something. Now, if he coulda just won a single World Series game (he went 0-4).

9. Now about first place. When I first became interested in baseball, Robinson was my hero. As he waned, Snider replaced him. Then as the Duke faltered, Koufax became my guy. That got me through high school and hero-worship of big leaguers. So I have no problem with those three being in the top positions. I’m not sure about the order. The ultimate problem is Robinson’s status as a civil rights icon. It so overshadows his on-field accomplishments that I’m not sure it didn’t get him first place more than his playing  ability did. Having said that, I recognize he was a heck of a player and when added to his late start (because of circumstances not of his making) and the abuse he suffered, maybe he is first. But Snider was as good, maybe better. And Koufax is simply the greatest pitcher I ever saw. I have my own order, but I have no real problem with the current order.

10. The location of a few more well-known names: Hershiser (12th), Valenzuela (13th), Wills (22nd), Reiser (31st), Podres (33rd), and Nomo (49th).

11. The most glaring omission? Carl Erskine.

Ol’ Diz

April 2, 2010

When I grew up, you could spend hours listening to greatness on the radio. There were Mel Allen and Russ Hodges. There were Red Barber and Jack Buck. There was the incomparable Vin Scully. Then there was Dizzy Dean.

Dean was from Arkansas, born in 1910. There used to be some dspute about when, but all the sources seem to have settled on January 1910. Part of the problem was Dean himself. He gave a variety of different answers to the question “When and where were you born?”  The gag was that everybody got a scoop, but it’s possible Dean simply didn’t know. One of the best of the pioneering farm system at St. Lous (Stan Musial gets my vote as the best), he got to the Cardinals in 1930, pitched one game, a three hit, one run, victory, then spent 1931 in the minors. Back with the Cardinals in 1932, he became a staple of the “Gas House Gang”, becoming their ace on the mound. In 1934 he became the last National League pitcher to win 30 games, as he led the Cards to a World Series victory over the Tigers. He won two games, his brother Paul the other two. He picked up the NL MVP award that season. In the 1937 All Star game he was injured (he broke his toe), cameback too soon, and his career fell apart. He was sent to Chicago, where he got into one more World Series in 1938, losing his only game. Pitching with decreasing ability he was done by 1941. In 1947 his employer, the St. Louis Browns, realized he needed one more year to be eligible for the Hall of Fame. He was announcing games at the time and had complained about the quality of Browns pitchers. The Browns pitchers wives essentially told him to put up or shut up, so the Browns, serving two purposes with one game,  got him into a game . He pitched four innings, gave up three hits, no runs, and got a single in his only at bat, giving him a season average of 1.000. His quip to the press was “Even Babe Ruth never done that”.  He pulled a muscle rounding the bag, which led to “I’m just glad I didn’t pull a muscle in my throat.”  He made the Hall of Fame in 1953.

The stories about him as a player are legion. Here’s a couple of my favorites. In 1934 he bet he could strike out Vince DiMaggio (Joe’s brother) four times in a game. He fanned DiMaggio the first three times at bat, then DiMaggio hit a foul pop in his fourth at bat. Dean yelled to the catcher “Drop it.” The catcher did and Dean proceeded to strike out DiMaggio for the fourth time. Also in 1934 he told the press he and his brother would win 45 games between them. The press accused him of bragging. The Deans ended up winning 49 games (30 for Dizzy, 19 for Paul). Dean’s response? “It ain’t braggin’ if you can do it.”

After he left the field, Dean got a job as the announcer for St. Louis Browns radio baseball, much to the joy of fans in the midwest and to the horror of English teachers everywhere. Dean was colorful as an announcer and was famous for butchering the English language. His most famous line was ” (Al) Zarilla slud into third.” Other wonderful moments included “He nonchalantly walked back to the dugout in disgust,” “The runners returned to their respectable bases,” and he occasionally signed off with “Don’t fail to miss tomorrow’s game.”

All this got him into trouble with English teachers. When they attacked him for saying “ain’t” his response was classic Dean. “A lotta folks who ain’t sayin’ ain’t, ain’t eatin’.” He finally compromised with the teachers by saying, “You learn ’em English, and I’ll learn ’em baseball.” Seems to have worked.

By the 1950s he was on television doing the Falstaff (a beer company) “Game of the Week.” He went through a number of color guys (I always wondered why Dean, of all people, needed a “color” guy.), but finally ended up with Dodgers great PeeWee Reese as his most famous “pardner.” He broadcast into the late 1960’s then retired. He died in July 1974 (everybody agrees on that).

I loved listening to Dean when I was younger. His voice was distinctive, his stories wonderful, his language colorful. To end this I want to give you my top Dean story. In the 1934 World Series he was a pinch runner. Trying to break up a double play, he was skulled. Unconcious, he was sent to the hospital. There are a couple of versions of what happened next. This is my favorite. Dean got out of the hospital and the reporters asked him what happened. He delivered my all time favorite deathless baseball line. “They x-rayed my head and didn’t find nothin’.”  Gotta love that man.

Nicknames

December 29, 2009

I adore nicknames. Most people I know have one. My son is “Ace”, my niece is “Gorgeous” (she is), a lot of my friends have them too. Baseball used to have really good ones. I don’t know if the quality of play is actually gotten better or worse, but the quality of nicknames has gone down. Check out the latest Yankees World Series winners. “The Hammer of God” certainly works for a closer, but “Tex”, “A-Rod”, “”Godzilla” is the best they can do? YUCK. Maybe the writers aren’t as creative anymore, maybe TV makes it harder to use nicknames because you don’t actually see them written down, maybe the frequency of player movement means fans don’t get close enough to become endeared of modern players.

Now I’m not saying all modern nicknames are awful, “Big Papi” has a heck of a ring to it, or that all old nicknames were great, “Babe” isn’t anything special for Ruth (but I do kinda like “The Sultan of Swat”). But as a rule the old names were better. So in the spirit of a good nickname is worth remembering, here’s my All Nickname Team of Great Players. To get on the team you gotta be a heck of a player and have a heck of a nickname. There are better players. There are better nicknames, but not better combinations.

First-Lou Gehrig, “The Iron Horse”

Second-Frankie Frisch, “The Fordham Flash”

Short-Harold “PeeWee” Reese

Third-J. Frank “Home Run” Baker

Left-Stan “The Man” Musial

Center-Joe DiMaggio, “The Yankee Clipper”

Right-“Hammerin” Hank Aaron

Catcher-Lawrence Peter “Yogi” Berra

Starting Pitcher-Walter Johnson, “The Big Train”

Closer-Mariano Rivera “The Hammer of God”

DH (per a comment from SportsPhd below)- Frank “The Big Hurt” Thomas

and to manage them, “The Little Napoleon,” John J. McGraw.

And I had to leave out “The Splendid Splinter” (Williams), “The Georgia Peach” (Cobb), “Ironman” (McGinnity), and “Dizzy” (Dean).

So who you got? Gimme better nicknames to go with better players.

Best Possible Game 5

December 13, 2009

Some of these are hard. It’s tough to decide the best game 2 or the best game 3. Other people will make other decisions. But some of these are really easy. The best game 5 in World Series history is realy, really, really easy. It’s the best pitched game in Series history.

The 1956 World Series was tied two games each when Don Larsen took the mound in the Bronx for the Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers on the 8th of October.  He faced a loaded line up: Jackie Robinson, PeeWee Reese, Duke Snider, Roy Campanella, and the Dodgers pitcher was Sal “The Barber” Maglie, a former Yankee.

Over the course of the game he struck out 7, including each Dodgers Hall of Famer once (Gil Hodges and Sal Maglie were 2 of the others) and barely had any full counts.  The Yankees got runs in the fourth on Mickey Mantle’s home run and in the sixth inning on a single, a sacrifice by Larsen, and Hank Bauer’s single. In between, Mantle made a spectacular catch off Hodges’ bat in the fifth to preserve the no hitter.

In the ninth, Larsen faced Carl Furillo who flied to right field, Campanella who grounded to second base, and pinch hitter Dale Mitchell, who provided the seventh and final strikeout to complete the perfect game. It’s the only no hitter, the only perfect game in World Series history.

A couple of asides are appropriate. Maglie pitched well that day, giving up only five hits and two walks. Except for Mantle’s homer, all the hits were singles.  Finally, Dale Mitchell didn’t end up in obscurity. The baseball field at the University of Oklahoma is named for him.

Honorable mention game 5:

1929-down by a run in the bottom of the ninth, the Philadelphia A’s score 2 runs to win the World Series over the Cubs.

1933-in the top of the 10th inning Mel Ott clubs a home run to put the New York Giants ahead of the Washington Senators. When the Senators fail to score in the bottom of the 10th, the Giants win the Series.

1942-with the score tied 2-2 in the top of the ninth, Whitey Kurowski hits a two-run home run to win the Series for the Cardinals over the Yankees.

1964-in the 10th inning, Tim McCarver’s three-run homer propels the Cardinals to another win over the Yankees. The Cards go on to take the Series in 7 games.

2001-in the bottom of the ninth, Scott Brosius’ two-run dinger ties the game. The Yankees defeat the Diamondbacks in 12 innings on two singles and a sacrifice bunt. They lose the Series in 7 games.